Hitachi festival themed summer party 2017

Power of the corporate party

Fast track to authentic customer relationships

The days when the company summer social was a pet project are history. The cultural shift towards making the work place both inspiring and fun, is fast elevating these annual gatherings onto the agenda of the C-suite, and senior marketers. And more significantly, by inviting customers and staff, companies are recognizing the relaxed, convivial setting of a summer party is a powerful way to give a big corporate a softer, more genuine persona.

 

In a world where every business is steering towards digital transformation, companies have to forge intense collaborations and build trust.  At the heart of building this trust is ‘authenticity’ – the new mantra. Hitachi Rail has long recognized the summer social has this strong emotional resonance in relationships.

 

Activities provided numerous opportunities for social-sharing, to enhance Hitachi Rail’s presence in the Twitterverse and wider social media. Business gets discussed at these socials but in a fashion, that’s more relaxed, open and genuine.

So, for the past three years, Shelton Fleming has been engaged by Hitachi Rail to produce the ultimate summer party. This year was no exception.

 

The event was themed around a festival-come-rural carnival concept. Packed with playful activities, a genial setting encouraged networking and presented an open, genuine quality to Hitachi Rail’s company culture. The festival vibe also implied a creative energy runs through Hitachi’s business. 

The geniality of the occasion is palpable. Theatrical cameos, like the living-hedges hugging guests on arrival, were an immediate ice-breaker and the perfect Instagram-ready photo opportunity. ‘Pimp my Prosecco’, the train-themed mini-golf, magical tree-bar, or giant photo-mosaic capturing selfies, which formed a high-speed train image, all served to make the guests feel at home.’ 

The catering was designed around food stations: a fire-pit with chilli-dogs and burgers, to Hot Chick and Macaroni and Cheese stalls.

 

As business tunes into Gen B – the behaviour generation – who value unique experiences, expect relationships.

Further reading