Blog

CES: BRANDS THAT DO, DO BEST

Why experiences need to encourage participation

Selling snow to Eskimos is the mythical skill of the ad men of old. Today the Eskimos aren’t so gullible, for we live in the Age of the Consumer. It’s the customers who increasingly mould and curate brands, making them their own through enthusiastic interaction.

Stop asserting it. Do it.

The future belongs to ‘behaviour brands’. Gone are the days when brands can sit by and allow a slick advertising campaign to bring the punters running. Behaviour brands must work hard to maintain their relationships. They have to do, not say. They have stop asserting their value and start demonstrating it.

Behaviour brands create resonant experiences that enable them to engage with their customers. They create value and become useful and valuable in the lives of their consumers. The logic is, if your brand behaves in authentic ways, it will prove its worth, encourage participation and create a distinctive point of view that is hard to copy.

Put utility first.

Of course, your brand still needs its unique DNA, expressed through brand ideas and platforms, but it also needs to activate strategy and words into actions and behaviours, both internally and externally. We need to move from brand statements to brand behaviour blueprints. From brand promises to proof points of usefulness. From the posturing of marketers to the actions of a real person. From stunts to authentic actions that are not just memorable, but actually change consumer behaviour. Because only if our content has utility will we create some kind of value for our customers. And only then will our brand really start to matter.

Worth turning up for?

If most people don’t care if 70% of brands disappear (so claim the stats) brands need to create real value if they’re ever going to matter. Eloquent articulations are no longer enough. Today, human truths lie at the heart of brand behaviour. At shows, like CES, we would argue, brand experiences need to walk the talk by engaging and listening, and inviting comment and creativity, in addition to entertaining, en masse.  

Further reading